A good mind is a universe expanded equally in all directions, and seeing in all directions is clarity.

As men, we are responsible for this world; our nation, our communities, our families, and ourselves. We cannot bring the good and the true into these lives with heavy atmosphere choking our reason and suppressing our imagination. The mind we want, and the mind others need us to have, sees what is simultaneously with what could be.

The mind of Swiss psychologist Carl Jung saw what is within men: four archetypes of masculinity, residing in the subconscious, and expressed in art, story, behaviors, and dreams. Jungian psychologists have used these archetypes with male patients to help them look inside themselves–and with clarity, see the manner of living, and the method of making the world live.


Symbolic Space: The Tower

Emblem: The Eye

Examples: Black Elk, Nathan Cohen (physicist), Nikola Tesla, Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar, Helio Gracie, the Wright brothers, GK Chesterton, Steven Spielberg, Moses


The man with the magician archetype wonders, envisions, contemplates, and reflects. He gathers his thoughts and plans, designs, creates, and manifests. The magician is the archetype of what and how; of learning, knowledge, skill, competence, insight, wisdom, enlightenment, and truth. The man powered by magician energy uses his imagination and intellect to design technology, communicate information, organize people, and spark creative power in those who then venerate him. The magician is “the brain behind the operation”.

Men who assume the magician’s power work with patterns–the shape and order of things. With patterns, they seek to form and reform, organize and reorganize numerals, objects, thoughts, behaviors…anything he can wrap his mind around and get his hands on. Such men exert authority over their environment, themselves, and others. They desire to craft their world to be like them; to structure and frame a reality that signifies who they are.

The intelligent magician organizes patterns to be simple and efficient, and simplicity and efficiency are signs of his intelligence.

His magic is cast with the use of symbols (eg. numerals, graphs, images, rituals, colors, etc.). Symbols communicate a large amount of information in a small amount of space, and access to information is access to power.

Initiation

A man must learn to access and initiate this archetype’s power. First, he feels beckoned to begin a quest and discover something for himself that is unlike all else he has learned. His intuition senses that he is called, and he has the power to accept or reject the call. Second, he must be transformed mentally by undergoing ritual initiation overseen by a teacher(s). This apprenticeship may take years of study or a few days of intense struggle, and may involve altered states of consciousness via prayer, physical exertion, or psychedelics. Third, he must return to the ordinary world to help and guide others. He is stronger, and awakened.

No longer like other men, his lifelong challenge is to live in a world while possessing great power, but without succumbing to the temptation to abuse it. He has become like a god. For a man to use his magic to elevate his brothers and his community, he is wise and good to call upon his warrior to defeat excess pride within him lest he view himself as superior to other “lesser” beings. He must acknowledge the limitedness of his awareness. The man of wisdom will say that he does not understand. When we distance ourselves from this truth we say, “We don’t understand”. The wise magician pursues the good and true, and the narcissistic magician pursues recognition and acceptance.

The Magician, and His Workmates

Magician men allied closely with the warrior archetype are determined problem-solvers. They revel in intellectual challenges as though athletes surging with adrenaline. No hill is too high and no cavern too deep for them to seek truth until truth reveals itself. Mathematics, science, engineering, and philosophy resonate with such men. Having experience of both the warrior and magician archetypes, they aggressively but patiently defend the truth.

“The scientific man does not aim at immediate result. He does not expect

that his advanced ideas will be readily taken up. His work is like

that of a planter–for the future. His duty is to lay the foundation

for those who are to come, and point the way.” -Tesla

Magician men intimately partnered with the lover archetype are inspired innovators. They are renewed by the act of creation, reproducing outwardly what they have conceived interiorly. The patterns with which they work always have meanings encoded into them. Art, music, spirituality, and healing professions invigorate such men. Having experience of both the lover and magician archetypes, they see no conflict between emotion and reason.

The Magician Calibrates Himself

The man who possesses magician energy shapes the world around him, and also the world within him. His mind is his instrument, and he commits himself to ensuring it is aligned properly. This man looks into and at himself with purpose and deliberation. He examines himself with both keen focus and panoramic vision, and his mind peers back at him; two mirrors at rest, face-to-face.

Such a man is aware of his purpose for using magician energy, and consequences for using it incorrectly. He knows what he does not know, and is willing to risk error in pursuit of truth. The man who does not calibrate himself is capable of shaping his world, but the pattern in which he forms it will reflect the disordered pattern in which he is formed.

Given the imaginative and creative power of the magician archetype, there are fewer stars in the sky than there are ways to use magician energy. And, like the stars, its direction is boundless, moving simultaneously in and out.

Suggested Reading
King, Warrior, Magician, Lover: Rediscovering the Archetypes of the Mature Masculine, by Robert Moore & Douglas Gillette

Source

Tesla. My Inventions: my early life. Electrical Experimenter (February). In Tesla: master of lightning. Margaret Cheney and Robert Uth. Barnes & Noble, Inc. 1999.